About

The Land of Aloha

Published in 1983, these unique books are a historically accurate account of the diverse elements that make up Hawaii.

The Land of Aloha contains articles written by some of Hawaii’s most respected writers: Edwin H. Bryan Jr, Samuel H. Elbert, Kenneth P. Emory, Glen Grant, Keith Haugen, Larry L. Kimura, Edgar Knowlton, Albertine Loomis, Donald D. Kilolani Mitchell, Dennis M. Ogawa, and Edward Sheehan to name a few.

The Land of Aloha contains the Pulitzer Prize winning editorial, Go for Broke, written by Hodding Carter II, which was published in the “Delta Democratic-Times”, Greenville, Mississippi, on August 27, 1945, and reprinted with permission.

The Land of Aloha was authenticated by some of Hawaii’s leading historians of Hawaiiana: Samuel H. Elbert, Professor Emeritus of Pacific Language and Linguistics, University of Hawaii at Manoa; Donald D. Kilolani Mitchell, Consultant in Hawaiian Culture at the Kamehameha Schools and the Bishop Museum; O.A. Bushnell, Professor Emeritus of Medical History, University of Hawaii at Manoa; Robert Schmitt, State Statistician; and Gwenfread E. Allen, writer of books and articles on Hawaiian history.

Unlike other books about Hawaii, The Land of Aloha has international appeal by presenting the stories of the many ethnic groups that came to Hawaii, translated into 21 languages.

Features include a brief history of Hawaii including ancient Hawaiian life-styles, discovery by Captain Cook, missionaries arrival, Hawaiian royalty, Pearl Harbor and sections on Hawaiian music and hula, to name a few.

The Land of Aloha is one of the first books to use glottal stops (‘) and macrons (-) in the writing of Hawaiian words. The glottal is similar to the sound between the oh’s in the English oh-oh. Vowels marked with macrons are somewhat longer than other vowels.